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 Post subject: Catch and Release
PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2007 7:57 pm 
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Fishaholic

Joined: Fri Jun 30, 2006 9:16 am
Posts: 318
Location: bangalore
Catch and release is a practice within recreational fishing intended as a technique of conservation. After capture, the fish are unhooked and returned to the water before experiencing serious exhaustion or injury. Using barbless hooks, it is often possible to release the fish without removing it from the water (a slack line is frequently sufficient).
Contents
[hide]
• 1 History of practice
• 2 Catch and release techniques
• 3 Debate
• 4 See also
• 5 References
• 6 External links

[edit] History of practice
In the United Kingdom, catch and release has been performed for more than a century by coarse fishermen in order to prevent target species from disappearing in heavily fished waters. Since the latter part of the 20th century, many salmon and sea trout rivers have been converted to complete or partial catch and release.
In the United States, catch and release was first introduced as a management tool in the state of Michigan in 1952 as an effort to reduce the cost of stocking hatchery-raised trout. Anglers fishing for fun rather than for food accepted the idea of releasing the fish while fishing in so-called "no-kill" zones. Conservationists have advocated catch and release as a way to ensure sustainability and to avoid overfishing of fish stocks. Lee Wulfe also promoted catch and release as he observed the Atlantic Salmon population dwindle.
In Australia, catch and release caught on slowly, with some pioneers practicing it the 1960s, and the practice slowly becoming more widespread in the 1970s and 1980s. Catch and release is now widely used to conserve — and indeed is critical in conserving — vulnerable fish species like the large, long lived native freshwater Murray Cod and the prized, slowly growing, heavily fished Australian bass, heavily fished coastal species like Dusky Flathead and prized gamefish like striped marlin.
In the Republic of Ireland, catch and release has been used as a conservation tool for atlantic salmon and sea trout fisheries since 2003. A number of fisheries now have mandatory catch and release regulations.[1] Catch and release for coarse fish has been used by sport anglers for as long as these species have been fished for on this island. However catch and release for Atlantic salmon has required a huge turn about in how many anglers viewed the salmon angling resource. To encourage anglers to practice catch and release in all fisheries a number of Governement led incentives have been implemented.[2] [3]

Catch and release is mandatory for some species in Canada, which also requires, in some cases, the use of barbless hooks to facilitate release and minimize injury.
[edit] Catch and release techniques

Fishing hook


Professor with pinched barb
Effective catch and release fishing techniques avoid excessive fish fighting and handling times, avoid damage to fish skin, scale and slime layers (that leave fish vulnerable to fungal skin infections) by nets, dry hands and dry surfaces, and avoid damage to throat ligaments and gills by poor handling techniques.
The use of barbless hooks is an important aspect of catch and release; barbless hooks reduce injury and handling time, increasing survival. Frequently, fish caught on barbless hooks can be released without being removed from the water, and the hook(s) effortly slipped out with a single flick of the pliers or leader. Barbless hooks can be purchased from several major manufacturers or can be created from a standard hook by crushing the barb(s) flat with needle-nosed pliers. Some anglers avoid barbless hooks because of the erroneous belief that too many fish will escape. Concentrating on keeping the line tight at all times while fighting fish, equipping lures that do not have them with split rings, and using recurved point or "Triple Grip" style hooks on lures, will keep catch rates with barbless hooks as high as those achieved with barbed hooks. Triple Grip treble hooks work particularly well with the barbs crushed.
To make a hook barbless, just use something like a pliers and sandpaper to get rid of the barb. Then penetrate the hook through some clothing and pull out. If the hook catches on the way out, the hook isn't completely off.
Key aspects of catch and release include:
• Using strong tackle, to minimise fighting times
• Using needle-nosed pliers to aid unhooking
• Using barbless hooks, for quick, easy hook removal and reduced handling times
• Leaving fish in the water during the unhooking and release process, to avoid any handling
If fish are removed from the water for unhooking and/or a photo, key aspects of handling include:
• Avoiding the use of landing nets; if landing nets must be used, specially designed catch-and-release landing nets (e.g. Environets) are used
• Avoiding touching the fish with dry hands or dry surfaces (e.g. shirt fronts) or putting them down on dry surfaces (e.g. rocks, boat gunwhales, boat bottoms)
• Only touching the fish with wet hands and wet surfaces (e.g. wet towel)
• Avoiding hanging fish from their jaw/mouth/gills
• Holding fish horizontally, and supporting large fish with a second hand under the belly
• Minimising time out of the water (e.g. 20–30 seconds)
The effects of catch and release vary from species to species. A number of scientific studies have shown extremely high survival rates (97%+) (e.g. [4]) for released fish if handled correctly and particularly if caught on artificial baits such as lures. Fish caught on lures are usually hooked cleanly in the mouth, minimising injury and aiding release. Other studies have shown somewhat lower but encouragingly high survival rates for fish gut-hooked on bait if the line is cut and the fish is released without trying to remove the hook. This procedure should be followed for any gut-hooked fish intended or required to be released.
[edit] Debate
Catch and release is criticised by some who claim it is unethical or immoral to stress fish for sport or amusement. Some oppose catch and release only but do not oppose fishing for food, per se.
Proponents of catch and release dispute the suggestion that fish hooked in the mouth feel pain. Many point to the fact that fish consume spiny, hard prey items such as crayfish, molluscs and other fish, and require a tough, insensitive mouth to do so; such a mouth is unlikely to feel a hook point. Some point to studies that claim fish lack the higher brain functions that physiologists often associate with the ability to feel pain. And some quote the many observations fishermen have made of fish succeeding in throwing a lure and then turning around and striking the same lure again, an unlikely behaviour if being hooked in mouth causes pain. Similarly, all observations from fishermen support the contention that hooked fish fight because they feel the pull of fishing line, not because the hook in their mouth hurts. Suitably strong tackle reduces fighting times and reduces stress on captured fish.
Opponents of catch and release point out that fish are highly evolved vertebrates that share many of the same neurological structures that, in humans, are associated with pain perception. They point to studies that show that, neurologically, fish are quite similar to "higher" vertebrates and that blood chemistry reveals that hormones and blood metabolites associated with stress are quite high in fish struggling against hook and line, resulting in increased mortality. The idea that fish do not feel pain in their mouths has been studied at the University of Edinburgh and the Roslin Institute by injecting bee venom and acetic acid into the lips of rainbow trout; the fish responded by rubbing their lips along the sides and floors of their tanks in an effort to relieve themselves of the sensation.[5] Lead researcher Dr. Lynne Sneddon wrote "Our research demonstrates nociception and suggests that noxious stimulation in the rainbow trout has adverse behavioral and physiological effects. This fulfils the criteria for animal pain." However, others argue this may demonstrate a chemical sensitivity rather than pain; notably, no similar result has been obtained with trauma, such as using fishhooks. Thus, the evidence for pain sensation in fish is ambiguous.[6] Some anglers accept the arguments that fish are highly evolved vertebrates that can feel pain, but again point out that that fish have tough, bony mouths that often consume spiny, hard prey items, and that hooks therefore do not cause fish pain, despite fish being capable of feeling pain.
Ultimately, and regardless of claimed ethical issues, catch and release is a conservation practice, developed out of necessity to prevent overharvest of fish stocks in the face of growing human populations, mounting fishing pressure, increasingly effective fishing tackle and techniques, inadequate fishing regulations and enforcement, and worsening habitat degradation. Scientific studies are showing generally high rates of survival for released fish — which is the aim of catch and release — and the alternative of banning or severely restricting angling is generally unreasonable or not feasible. Fishermen have been practising catch and release for decades now, including with some highly pressured fish species, and no significant, measurable effects from catch and release have been observed, indicating that mortality rates from catch and release are not excessive. Conversely, had recreational fishing for these highly pressured species continued to the present on a totally catch and kill basis, some of these species fisheries would certainly have collapsed by now.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2007 8:08 pm 
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Fishaholic

Joined: Fri Jun 30, 2006 9:16 am
Posts: 318
Location: bangalore
Please note I am not the editor of this write up.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2007 4:19 pm 
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Fishaholic

Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2006 10:39 am
Posts: 1601
Location: Mumbai / India
We would have known that Bobbee ... first its not in CAPS and second no "Jim Morrisson " rambling ... :evil: :evil: :evil: :evil:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2007 5:09 pm 
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Site Admin
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Joined: Mon Jun 26, 2006 5:37 pm
Posts: 1932
Location: Bangalore
That's a nice article Bobbee, good work.

Just make sure that if it does hit the newspapers it should be a follow up to an article about angling.

Bops


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2007 5:11 pm 
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Fishaholic

Joined: Mon Jul 24, 2006 10:39 am
Posts: 1601
Location: Mumbai / India
Hey Bobbee forgot to add ... Nice article and nice of you to post ..


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2007 9:24 pm 
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Fishaholic

Joined: Fri Jul 07, 2006 11:14 am
Posts: 186
Location: Bangalore
Hi Bobbee,

Very useful and informative.

Thanks for posting.

Sandeep


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 23, 2007 11:33 pm 
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Fishaholic

Joined: Tue Jan 30, 2007 4:55 pm
Posts: 2142
Location: Just outside New Delhi
Thanks mate. Every little bit towards catch and release is a big help.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 04, 2010 12:51 am 
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Fishaholic
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Joined: Mon Jan 25, 2010 9:26 pm
Posts: 182
Location: new delhi
I was about to write up a fresh thread on Catch and Release, when i decided to search if someone else had done it previously here. This article is perfect, should be a mandatory read for people joining in. Proper handling of fish is such a critical part of the catch and release process, which is usually not paid attention to.

Also, de-barbing your hooks and trebles increases the sport element of the game. The fish wont remain hooked unless the line pressure is consistent.

No dry hands or surfaces and minimum handling of the fish. Definetely no hands on gills and no squeezing.

The more we release, the more chances of a good fishery. Fishing is reflective of our attitude towards consuming resources of our planet. Sustaining the resources will only reward our future. Opponents of this view always defend their inability to effect a change in the big picture. A little care, a little optimism and you never know....we gotta try, atleast..it IS our world yknow!

[meant with no disrespect to anyone's views or sensibilities]


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 04, 2010 4:08 am 
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Fishaholic

Joined: Sun May 09, 2010 1:53 pm
Posts: 958
Location: Sydney, Australia
I think we have to understand why people catch large numbers of fish and not release them:

1. Ignorance -in India I doubt if most anglers are aware of bag limits or
size limits, either by choice or due to lack of information?

2. Non-enforcement - I think that if the Fisheries Dept. were more strict
in enforcing these limits,it would help ensure compliance and awareness.

This seems to be a widespread failing , here in Australia as well as in Canada.
However, during the Shah's time in Iran, the guards patrolling the beats
were prominent and strict in enforcing the rules.

I was pleasantly surprised to note the guides at Corbett being meticulous in checking that we fished only with barbless hooks and released all the mahseer with care.

3. Lack of knowledge - most people tend to think that a fish will die as
soon as it comes out of the water. They lack the techniques/tools
for a proper and safe release (net, pliers, minimal handling etc.)

4. Greed - no need to expound on this.

5. Competition - let us face it, we are all guilty of this at some time in our
angling life.

It is therefore incumbent upon us to spread the gospel through this forum
and in person when meeting newcomers to the sport.

I have personally seen that this approach,applied from the very beginning, helps
ensure that the next generation carries a better set of angling values with them.

Kingfish


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 04, 2010 6:29 am 
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Fishaholic
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Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2010 6:44 pm
Posts: 158
Location: jammu and kashmir
i'm content that people have read this topic.following it is a different matter. the previous two posts which basically are a summarised and having understood threads.to inculcate any spirit and values for future gen is welcomed.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 04, 2010 11:38 am 
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Fishaholic
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Joined: Mon Jan 25, 2010 9:26 pm
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Location: new delhi
I agree with Kingfish. I was started on fishing from day one with catch and release when I was 12. It's ingrained in my system. I find it rather wasteful to not release.

I think that there's a case of protecting the wild fish of the streams/lakes(d-uh!!!). Fishery bred fish are akin to poultry chicken, I find my primal impulse, to eat what i catch, satiated by farm bought rainbows. The wild/free fish deserve a chance to survive in their natural, albeit introduced( for trout), habitat.

Ignorance and non-enforcement go in hand in India. I've seen veteran and experienced anglers (most respectfully) catch fingerlings and dehooking them by squeezing them with dry hands and chucking them into the river from an overhead rock. Hardly the best release. Locals have other things to worry about than catch and release..theyre on a subsistence level. The only way to protect these wild fisheries is to educate and empower locals into guiding and conservation. Once they start earning substantial revenue, they will automatically gravitate away from poaching.enforcement by officials will always be difficult without participation by the locals.

It is also of paramount importance for the educated angler to spread the word amongst his brethren. We all need to realize that these fish are a finite resource. All over the world we are dealing with the depletion of species in the biosphere. Our pleasure of catching, can only be sustained by releasing. And not just selective release, catch-to-kill should be brought down to the minimum possible level by anglers, atleast.

I'm not afraid that there will be no fish left for me to catch. I'm saddened that our next generations may never get to catch one!! [should they ever choose to :) ]


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 04, 2010 5:35 pm 
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Fishaholic
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Joined: Wed Sep 22, 2010 6:44 pm
Posts: 158
Location: jammu and kashmir
in context.the practice of cnr is what is important.locations around the world have there own rules and regulations for it.some places adhere to it strictly and some have liberal rules.in kashmir we have our own rules. where i fish most of the time there is bag limit of 6 fish above 25cm.what this translates to is that 6 fish of and above this length can be taken for consumption.now it all depends on the catch.sometimes we catch nothing and another day the full limit is met.certain times individuals release every fish coz they r either vegetarians or they dont eat fish.i on certain occasions have brought back just one for my self and released everything else.i have also noticed that cnr practice doest not guarantee the same fish to be caught a no. of times.even if all anglers release the fish maximum no. are taken by poachers, natural causes, floods and power projects to name a few.trout as we all know has a double value.great to catch and makes great eating.its sort of a novelty.our state govt has done a lot to preserve this species and to curb rampant poaching has introduced various plans and actions.we do practice cnr but to a limited extent and thats the way it will be.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 05, 2010 3:34 pm 
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Fishaholic
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Joined: Thu Jul 13, 2006 4:58 pm
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Location: Hong Kong
Good Post Bobbie,

Good to see you on the forum after a long time.

We have always had a debate when it comes to Catch and Release. I tend to ask people to use common sense if there are no rules and do their bit. I do not see the harm in taking a couple fo fish for the pot.

I request people to think for themselves and their actions when they release and not to think, that if I release the fish, that fish will scumb to something else, what ever that is, so why should I release it. Well you just do your bit, at the very least.

If we apply the logic that someone else is going to kill that fish or that fish will die for what ever reasons, that way of thinking is flawed. If you apply that logic, hell, that fish is going to die anyway, all fish do, so why release at all?

What I say is "YOU" give that fish a chance when you can. Be responsible for your action.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2010 9:02 pm 
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Fishaholic

Joined: Tue Jun 27, 2006 6:22 pm
Posts: 1658
Location: Kolkata,India
Quote:
Good Post Bobbie,

Good to see you on the forum after a long time.


Too much of the green stuff, eh Bobby ... Check the date of the first post of Bobbee, mate.. Its way back in '07 :lol: :lol:

Tight Lines mate,
GRC

and stay off the intoxicants :twisted: :twisted:


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2010 11:28 pm 
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Fishaholic
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i know gavin...i checked it...in any case the year of the post does not expire the validity of the message :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 07, 2010 11:31 pm 
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Fishaholic
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oopppsss..i dont think that message from gavin was aimed at me.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 08, 2010 7:34 pm 
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Fishaholic

Joined: Tue Jun 27, 2006 6:22 pm
Posts: 1658
Location: Kolkata,India
Quote:
i know gavin...i checked it...in any case the year of the post does not expire the validity of the message :)


:evil: :evil: Dude, chill !!! And have some of the green stuff as well [smilie=cool_goatee.gif] [smilie=cool_goatee.gif]

Tight Lines,
GRC


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