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 Post subject: Fishing tips
PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2007 6:02 pm 
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The locals are the best bet to find out where, when and what the fish bit on.

The lighter line you use the better feel you get and there is less water drag on it so you feel the bites better. Remember: fish light for the HOT bite.

Fresh or if possible, live bait will alwasys help you catch more fish. Live worms prawns or nippers produce best results.

Fishing the mouths of estuaries on the runout tide produces excellent results as the predators wait for the tide to sweep all the tasty morsels in therir direction.

Fishing at jetties on the high tide produces best results as the high water allows fish to swim up the high spots on the plyons and other fish that eat them follow.

Dont ever over use ground bait. If they are full up they wont take your bait.

Do clean up after you`ve finished so people dont slip on old bait, line etc.

Wear spiked shoes - I was told old golf shoes are perfect - when fishing slimy rocks. Never fish the rocks alone. Do wear a life jacket at all times when fishing from a boat. Its just as easy to dwon in 2 mts. of water as it is in 10!

Kill your fish quickly. It`s humane and they are much better to eat when they have been bled.

Take a camera with you. Have you ever noticed that the best fishing moments always seem to happen when you dont have one? Aw! [smilie=holyshit.gif] you should have seen the one I caught!

Dont handle a fish that you are unfamiliar with, there are lots of hidden spike on some that can do damage.

Dont return freshwater karnatic carps, african/catfish etc to the water live. They are a noxious pests that must be killed on sight.

Dont store you fishing lines where they will be in direct contact with sunlight. Ultraviolet radiation in sunlight weakens fishing lines.

Dont hurry the fish you have hooked. Take your time. Most fish are lost by hooks pulling and line brreaking through the angler`s impatience.

Dont ever turn your back on the sea when rock fishing. There zre rogue waves that have a habit of looming up when you least expect it and rock fishing is the most dangerous sport on Earth!

Lastly? Dont drink alchol. Booze and fishig jut dont mix, there are too many sharp things lying around inviting trouble.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2007 7:14 pm 
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Hey Bobbee,

What's a nipper? Sounds interesting.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2007 9:29 pm 
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I suspect that a "Nipper" is a smal crstacian sometimes called "Bass Yabbie" by the Aussies.

I'm a little concerned about the imperitive to kill all carnatic carp though as they're a native species. African catfish, tilapia and others I could understand though.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 31, 2007 10:41 pm 
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Have to add a few important ones.

Never pick up somebody else's rod when it gets a bite. However good a friend the person might be.

Don't leave fish to go find fish.

If a plug/bait/spot is not working change it.

And!!!

Never ever think you are smarter than a fish.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 9:44 am 
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nipper is the claw of a crab or lobster. This used to catch fish mainly among reefs.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Jun 01, 2007 10:10 am 
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Quote:
What's a nipper?


Bobbee's googly of the month :lol: :lol: :lol:

Hey Bobbee - Wishing U many happy returns of the day..More of this on another thread..


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2007 2:54 am 
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Mahaseerken wrote:
Have to add a few important ones.

Never pick up somebody else's rod when it gets a bite. However good a friend the person might be.


Jst a question why not?????


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2007 9:55 am 
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You just don't if he is around that is. Shout for him, scream, jump up and down.... but lay yur hands off. I picked up one once and failed to hook the fish... fel pretty shi***** later.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2007 2:39 pm 
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Ken,
That was- A Turtle, not a fish mate ;) So, no sweat!!! Thanks for not hooking him!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 13, 2007 3:02 pm 
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Thanks Doc. That makes me feel better... or does it?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2007 9:03 pm 
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hi beemorein
excellent tips. i dont know about Indian rivers but in Pakistani rivers, Goonch is another fish which must never be released. Damn thing grows about 100 kgs and eats many kgs of live fish every day. I once saw a 2 kg Rohu in a 50 kg Goonch netted by a local fisherman. By the way what exactly is a carnatic carp? what is its local name?
Cheers
Sualeh


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2007 9:26 pm 
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Quote:
Goonch is another fish which must never be released. Damn thing grows about 100 kgs and eats many kgs of live fish every day.


Sounds like a prime sport fish to me, and I suspect you'd be suprised at how little it actually eats - probably just over it'd own bodyweight of prey in a year.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2007 9:49 pm 
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Hi Ken
Goonch is a good sport fish and gives fairly good fight. No match to mahseer though. Regarding its eating habit, i happen to inspect the stomach of few Goonch when they were being prepared by locals. It had enough fish of all size to fill a decent acquirium. And some of the very big ones had such big fish inside the stomach that any angler would have liked to hook. Its not a good table fish though so not commercially well sought after. Has a fearsome appearance and razor sharp teeth like a shark. In Pakistan, it is also called the fresh water shark. When a 100 lb Goonch enters the area, you would always know about it.
Cheers
Sualeh


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2007 10:04 pm 
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I agree that no native species should be targeted as a pest.Let nature balance itself.Usually apex predators are very important in maintaining the balance.
Regards,
Yaj.


Last edited by yaj on Sun Sep 16, 2007 1:52 am, edited 1 time in total.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Sep 15, 2007 11:24 pm 
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Hi Guys,

It saddens me When some one says that a particular species should not be released cause it had a rohu in its stomach.I for one do not know of much goonch in our waters other than the northern rivers and always dremt of a big goonch on my line. Remember reading about the Goonch in " rod & reel in India ". The goonch has all my respects.


Jeen


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2007 1:11 am 
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Tiger may be a wonderful animal but you cant have too many of them in one area, they will spoil the balance. In certain areas of Punjab, there are too many of these Goonches. Since they are not a good table fish, commercial fisherman are not too interested in catching them. So, at a place where everyone is after the carps, singhara and sowl because they are good table fish, its in fitness of things not to release the large size goonch. Small ones, however, may be released. Its good to dream of a big goonch on the line but it may also be appropriate to know about the local environment before releasing it back.
Cheers
Sualeh


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2007 1:40 am 
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Quote:
Tiger may be a wonderful animal but you cant have too many of them in one area, they will spoil the balance.


Tigers are the balance ! You can't have "to many" of them because they will naturally only increase their population to a point that can be sustained by the local population of prey species. The only time when there should be a confict is when man comes along and goes into competition with the tiger by overexploiting those same prey species.

Much the same is true in the aquatic environment. If you feel that Goonch or any other aquatic predator is taking to many fish, you need to start asking yourself some serious questions about the sustainability of your own actions.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Sep 16, 2007 8:00 pm 
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Im completely with Ken on this one ... absolute fact ....well said Ken


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Sep 18, 2007 8:07 pm 
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Ken L wrote:
Quote:
The only time when there should be a confict is when man comes along and goes into competition with the tiger by overexploiting those same prey species.


This exactly is the situation. Men and beast are after the same species. The authorities should control illegal fishing but they are not serious about it. It is in this context that i feel that large Goonch in such areas should not be released.
I fully agree with Ken on the balance thing and with the fact that we are ourselves responsible for spoiling this balance. I wish that we are successful in restoring this 'ideal balance' and than I will have no problems releasing a goonch of whichever size.
Cheers
Sualeh


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2007 2:14 am 
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Sualeh.
I can see that you're still not convinced.
I would suggest that the situation with Gooch in North India and Pakistan is somewhat similar to the situation with pike in Europe.
Both are big toothy ambush predators so removing the big ones will mean more prey fish for everyone to catch, right ? Well actually, no !
Here's a little light reading for you concerning pike - but substitue the species concerned with local ones and you might se where I'm comming from.
http://www.anglersnet.co.uk/Coarse-Fish ... _pike.html


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2007 3:15 pm 
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well, Ken!

very informative article, just a couple of questions though,

are pike and gooch behave exactly the same way? (living a same kind of life style)
and having a balanced population of goonch is as necessary as mentioned for pike on this column?

Rana...


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2007 3:35 pm 
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Ken, That was an interesting read and provided an indepth analysis of the marine ecosystem.
Thank you for shring the article.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2007 5:04 pm 
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Pike are predominantly ambush predators and they mainly target prey that is some way weak through age, injury or disease. They will usually attack from the cover of weed or structure but will on occasion hunt activly. I would suggest that there are significant similarities with the goonch but rather than structure, the goonch appears to use the bottom as it's main source of cover. Both have a mouthfull of fish grabbing teath and both are relativly large compared to the popuation of prey fish that they feed on. I would suggest that whilst there are differences but as both are apex predators with somewhat similar strategies, we can consider them to be similar enough to apply what we know of the place of one species in it's ecosystem to the place of the other in its.

It's interesting to see what happened in places like Ireland's Lough (Lake) Corrib where there were some very large pike and an active salmon and trout fishery. The people controlling the lough decided to try to increase the survival rates of young trout and salmon by culling the pike with gill nets. The result was that the local community immediatly lost income from the pike anglers that had previously travelled to fish the lough and over the next few years, the explosion of small pike totally devastated the trout and salmon fishery, which is only now starting to recover as the large pike re-establish themselves.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2007 6:36 pm 
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The goonch as compared to the pike share different lifestyles. The pike prefers slow moving water and lakes where as goonch are found in swift rivers. Goonch normally remain at the bottom.

Also a point to note. Goonch belong to the family of catfish( Sisoridae ). While the Pike belongs to Esocidae. Taking these points into consideration the methods of landing these fish should be different.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2007 9:06 pm 
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But the main point is that both are apex predators which are essential to keep the sytem healthy.Most apex predators even on land are essential to keep the numbers of the herbivores down and weeding out sick and weak specimens.When the apex predators are removed The balance goes out of tilt some species populations explode resulting in them eating out others from the equation.
Thats also why lures are usually designed to imitate sick or injured fish ;-)
Regards,
Yaj.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 19, 2007 9:36 pm 
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Hi Ken
First let me say that i am not just trying to prove my point. I will not be rigid and will be glad to learn anything new and useful. Now, after having read the article, i feel we are talking of two dissimilar situations. Area mentioned in the article is a fishery/lake with controlled environment and hardly any illegal fishing. I am talking of the rivers of central and southern Punjab where there is lot of illegal fishing going on; hence the balance has already been disturbed.
First point, just imagine that there was lot of illegal fishing in the lake mentioned in the article resulting in sharp decline in trout population; would you still like to release large and medium size pike?

Second, pike are canabalistic which helps in maintaining balance. Goonch have three hard spines on the body due to which large goonch normally does not prey on smaller ones.

Third, there are very few large predators in English waters othre than pike. In Pakistani rivers, we have murrels, mulleys, singharas, tarkandas, Khaggas and many other type of catfish, all ferocious predators. Interestingly, Singhara, most khaggas and Tarkanda also have two to three hard spines because of which they are not a preferred meals of large predators. So, not releasing a few large Goonch will, in my opinion, help in restoring the balance which has been disturbed by illegal fishing for other species.

I wish the kind of control that has been maintained on illegal fishing in countries like England can be done in Pakistan as well. Should that happen, i wont be arguing my point anymore and will be in full agreement with you. To conclude, i would say that a successful theory/practice in one part of the world may not work at all in another area, if the environment is different. The local environment must always be kept in mind.

Regards
Sualeh


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2007 2:25 am 
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Ah well.

There's no point in getting into an argument but I still think you're on very dangerous ground when you start to remove adult apex predators from an ecosystem.
It doesn't matter what the persieved logic of it is, the outcome is always going to be a disaster, whether it's pike in Ireland, zander in England, lions in the Serengetti or Goonch in the Punjab.

When you justify the removal of goonch from a river in Punjab by saying that the catla a rohu fishery is more productive without it's apex predators at the top of the food chain, how do you then tell local fishermen in Karnataka or HP that they can't remove the mahseer (Also the apex predator in their riverine environment) from the Cauvery or Ganga in order to increase the number of fish that they can catch ?
The fact is that you can't and trying to do so will totally undermine the attemps of any pro angling body that attempts to raise the issue of mahseer conservation with government.

The only way to go is sustainability because tinkering simply doesn't work.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 20, 2007 8:59 pm 
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Hi Hamdhingra
Can you give your expert views on the subject?
Thanks
Sualeh


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2007 2:06 am 
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Just a last thought - and nothing to do with conservation strategies.
If you have local waters that are capable of regularly producing goonch in excess of 50kg's, you have a resourse there that's worth more than all the rohu in the river.
Do yourself an internet seach for catfish guiding operations on the rivers Ebro (Spain), Soane (France) or Po (Italy) and you'll see what sort of potential money spinner the goonch really is for someone who can provide accomodation and guiding services for European anglers.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 21, 2007 2:49 am 
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Thanks Ken, as an angler I fully appreciate the proposal. But the local fishermen may not. To fully understand the point you have to know the local conditions. In my country, economic benefits far overtake the angling ethics. Fishery department give streches of the river on lease to commercial fishermen in most of the areas. These commercial fishermen use all kinds of legal and illegal techniques to catch as much fish as they can and do not allow others, even the proper anglers, to fish in their area. Authorities and most fishermen do not care much about conservation. The emphasis is on catching carps and murrel etc since they fetch more money in the market. Gooch is one of least sought after species and large size goonch otherwise normally breaks the gill nets meant for med size carp and murrel. In this environment, anglers like me do not have much of say. However, i will certainly search the net on the subject. Another problem is that Goonch only survives in large rivers and all large rivers have been leased out to commercial fishermen. Thanks for the input.
Regards
Sualeh


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 8:14 pm 
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Sualeh,

I read somehwere that the Goonch was actually introduced into much of the Indus basin including Southern Punjab during the latter days of the British Raj and is not actually completely native.

I know for a fact that they were not present in the upper Indus until they were introduced into Chashma barrage in the eighties and they started eating everything up.

Nonetheless, I am against all freshwater commercial fishing. Aquaculture should be promoted.

Have they started raising predatory fish in fish farms in Pakistan and India? I think they do keep Sowl but Im not sure about Singhara and Mulley.

It would be great fun to cast a plug into a pond stocked full of mulley and singhara.


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 9:27 pm 
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Ali wrote:
Sualeh,

Have they started raising predatory fish in fish farms in Pakistan and India? I think they do keep Sowl but Im not sure about Singhara and Mulley.

It would be great fun to cast a plug into a pond stocked full of mulley and singhara.


Hi Ali,

Sol, Singara and mulley are farmed commercially in Northern India, but they are not really popular simply beacuse it is a problem feeding them... it is easier to farm R.C.C- rohu, catla, carp as their feed can be procured easily...

as far as they fight goes.... pound for pound, a wild fish will fight 10 times harder than a pond raised one... my logic on this is that the pond fish does not know any sort of fear... no predators, no nothing of the sort!!!

Cheers,
IG


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PostPosted: Mon Oct 01, 2007 9:50 pm 
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IG,

Its odd that they arent that popular in fish farms. Singhara and sowl get a better price in the market than the carps.

I remember reading in one of the old Raj era fishing books about a sahib in the Punjab Police who fished for mulleys using spoons and "phantoms" (I had to look it up, old word for plug) in ponds that were created due to yearly monsoonal flooding. He described it as the best substitute to spinning for mahseer.

With the condition the five rivers are in today I doubt that that would be possible...

Oh well theirs always the clear blue waters of Mangla Dam. If you're familiar with the old books Mangla is the spot where the famous Jungoo pool at Tangrote used to be. Sadly their are virtually no mahseer in Mangla, it has plenty of singharas and some mulley though.

I have heard that the Pong reservoir is the same story, good mahseer habitat but few mahseer and lots of singhara. Why do you think these two lakes have become singhara havens rather than mahseer ones?


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PostPosted: Tue Oct 02, 2007 12:44 am 
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Ali wrote:
IG,

Its odd that they arent that popular in fish farms. Singhara and sowl get a better price in the market than the carps....

I remember reading in one of the old Raj era fishing books about a sahib in the Punjab Police who fished for mulleys using spoons and "phantoms" (I had to look it up, old word for plug) in ponds that were created due to yearly monsoonal flooding. He described it as the best substitute to spinning for mahseer.


I have heard that the Pong reservoir is the same story, good mahseer habitat but few mahseer and lots of singhara. Why do you think these two lakes have become singhara havens rather than mahseer ones?



Hi Ali,

1) Its a simple case of supply & demand... sol and mulley command a higher price becuase the supply is not there, they are not bony and the meat has a different texture... every idiot is raising RCC... there is a ut in the market... therefore the prices have crashed...

2) As you correctly mentioned... "in ponds that were created due to yearly monsoonal flooding"... the fish were wild fish that got trapped in these waters... at some point of their life, they understood the concept of survival of the fittest, and how not to become lunch for someone else!!! fish raised in a pond from fry don't know that feeling!!!

3) Pong... what can I say... everyone thinks that place has gone to the singhara... i agree, the geography of place is perfect for breeding singhara... there are some really big specimens there... I've ulled out a 8 kg singhara from there!!!!
As far as the mahseer are concerned, they are smarter than normal... there are still tons of mahseer there... mahseer who you will see in the water, but mahseer who will not touch your lure... but they are there and they can be caught... if you know how...

Cheers,
IG


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 02, 2007 11:25 am 
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I personally think that what Sualeh is trying to say is that the waters in Pakistan are under immense pressure form all forms of illegal activity....
:x

And as Ali has put it we have immense problems in Pakistan were various species are introduced with out assessing the consequences. The intro of Sowl to Tarbella is another prime example. Tarbela as an echo system is under immense pressure and the Masheer which at one time was the only Apex predator is struggling against Man and now the Sowl.

I can understand Sualehs concern. They are days when u can go fishing and catch nothing. Places that were once teaming with Fish of all types now u c none. Ultimately the goonch will run out of Food in Pakistan unless it’s a scavenger as well.
:idea:
As for the opportunity of aqua culture suggested by Ali, I think that’s are one real hope….. because if the commercial fishing and netting of our waters..


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 8:04 pm 
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Ali wrote:
I read somehwere that the Goonch was actually introduced into much of the Indus basin including Southern Punjab during the latter days of the British Raj and is not actually completely native.

I know for a fact that they were not present in the upper Indus until they were introduced into Chashma barrage in the eighties and they started eating everything up.

Hi Ali
As far i know, Goonch is a native Asian specie. Even if British introduced it in Indus waters, it must have been from Asian waters, most probably from far east. Goonch is one of the oldest living freshwater fish and is also called a living fossil. It likes warm waters and therefore, is found downstream of Chashma Barrage. Its prime habitat is central and southern Punjab where waters are warm and big. You wont normally see a goonch in smaller water. You wont also see a goonch in snow fed waters like Indus (upstream of Tarbella), Jhelum and Chenab untill they enter central Punjab where temperatures remain relatively high.

My point of view regarding not releasing a large size goonch is related to the peculiar environment of central and southern Punjab and should be considered in that context only. I am not at all trying to advocate that goonch caught anywhere should not be released.
Cheers
Sualeh


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 8:21 pm 
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As for raising predators in the farms... I agree with IG that it is primarily the feed that causes a problem. There is another issue which again is related to the feed. In Pakistan, few people have ventured raising sowl and singhara in farms because in the long run, it is not profitable as compared to Carps. A grass carp, if properly fed, grows to more than 2 kgs in a year in Punjab whereas a sowl or singhara only grows about a kg, that too if it is fed well. Ali correctly mentioned that sowl and singhara fetch more price but when it comes to gross product from a farm, carps are very difficult to match.
I know of few farmers who tried to raise sowl and even went to the extent of stocking their farms with chalwas and other bait fish on regualar basis. But they mostly gave up because it was too much of a hardwork to catch chalwas, frogs and other bait fish every second day.
There are few farmers who have leased naturally existing ponds along the Chenab river in marala. Those places are good for raising sowl and singhara because there is plenty of small fish already there and both sowl and singhara can breed in still waters. Mulley on the other hand breeds in flowing waters only and there it breeds like hell. That's why it is the most common predator in Punjab waters.
The point i am trying to make is that it is much easier and profitable to establish a farm along the river side making use of naturally existing depressions and people in Punjab are learning this fast. Their is a danger of loosing everything during floods but one can invest in that and make proper arrangements.
Cheers
Sualeh


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 9:43 pm 
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Yes the Goonch is a native South Asian species, but they werent found in the upper Indus until the introdcution by the fisheries "mehkama".

I wonder if they take lures.

As for feeding predatory fish, wouldnt they do well on commercial trout pellets? Or even animal offal ground up with regular commercial fish food.


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 03, 2007 9:59 pm 
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Even if Goonch were introduced by Fisheries Dept in upper Indus, i dont think they would have flourished because the water is too cold for Goonch up there.
Goonch are ferocious predators, also known as freshwater sharks. Best is to use a live bait. They also come on lures (plugs, soft plastic lures of large size). But they wont normally take anthing which is static. Come on moving objects only. I have seen people using almost a half kg fish as a bait to catch large size goonch. A frind of mine caught 29 kg goonch using a parri of about 10 inches as bait.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2007 10:02 am 
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[/quote]As for feeding predatory fish, wouldnt they do well on commercial trout pellets? Or even animal offal ground up with regular commercial fish food.

As far as feeding predatory fish like Sol/Singhara/ Mulley is concerned I think yes Ali has a valid point Food Pellets used for Trout can be tried and animal offal can also be another option. I say this because it has always been sucessful in attracting singhara/Mulley by ground baiting the area with can of punctured Dog food. :lol:

But the main Problem of fish farming in pakistan is that getting the fry/small fish of the predatory species is a big problem. The fisheries only provide fry/fish seed of the carp family and I thin you can only get Masheer fry from selected fisheries, The hatchery ar Hattian Kamran has managed to sucessfully breed Masher.

As far as Goonch on lures as far as I am aware goonch are the more bottom predator type. Never heard of them being caught on lures, but as Sualeh has mentioned goonch on live bait is more common..... :P


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 04, 2007 7:42 pm 
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shaphan wrote:
As for feeding predatory fish, wouldnt they do well on commercial trout pellets? Or even animal offal ground up with regular commercial fish food.
But the main Problem of fish farming in pakistan is that getting the fry/small fish of the predatory species is a big problem. The fisheries only provide fry/fish seed of the carp family and I thin you can only get Masheer fry from selected fisheries, The hatchery ar Hattian Kamran has managed to sucessfully breed Masher.
[/quote]
Hi Shaphan, point is not that Singhara or Sowl wont take the trout pallets or such like things. Point is to make it economical. I have a good understanding of trout fisheries in northern areas. Trout feed in the ong run gets quite expensive and that is whytrout is sold 600-800 Rs per kg. The only economical way is to stock the pool with a large no of bait fish much before you put in sowl or singhara fry. A portion of pool should be stony so that bait fish can hide and breed there. To do this, one needs to have a good understanding of natural ecosystem where these predators thrive. Most of our fish farmers do not have this knowhow and the fisheries dept is not concerned about it. As for the sowl/singhara fry, it is commercially available in large quantities from Hafizabad Hatchery near Gujranwala.
Cheers
Sualeh


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2007 10:00 am 
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Sualeh Sb,

Plz forgive me for my ignorance. Actually thats the point I was trying to make the fisheries have'nt made this info public and neither do they intend to.

If your starting up a farm or want to stock up your dam with Singhara, Sol they dont pass on the info.

Does this hatchery alos supply Masheer fry :?:


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2007 6:57 pm 
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Shaphan, i absolutely agree with you on the behaviour of fisheries dept. Mahseer fry is aval on commercial scale from Attock/haripur hatcheries.
Regards
Sualeh


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PostPosted: Fri Oct 05, 2007 8:53 pm 
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They also breed mahseer at a fish farm in Timergara in Dir.

If warmwater fish would survive the winters up in my neck of the woods I'd be the first one to stock up a lake full of mahseer, singhara and sowl, but alas when the ponds freeze over Katlas and rohus die, I dont think teh predators would fare any better.

common and silver carp are able to survive through the winter though.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2007 12:48 am 
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There's me thinking that the Mahseer do very well in cold glacier fed rivers in the north where the winter air temperatures get distinctly chilly - certanly cold enough to have me shivering in Delhi in January.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2007 1:10 am 
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You are right Ken but the area that Ali is talking about freezez in winters. Mahseer can not survive in a freezed lake or stream. Only trout and snow carp can (talking of northern areas of Pakistan)
Ali, there is a recent trend of raising mirror and leather carps (strains of european common carp) in the northern areas and its getting quite popular. As you metioned, these carps survive fairly well during freezing winters.
Cheers
Sualeh


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2007 2:36 am 
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The real survival specialists are crucian carp. They slow their bodies down so much that they can survive long term ice. In these conditions, it's not the cold tthat kills fish, it's the lack of oxygen in the water as the bacteria in the bottom silt use up almost all of what was there before the water froze.
In these conditions (usually shallower pools and lakes), the crucians are often the only fish that will be present in the water.


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2007 10:11 am 
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I really hope that no one goes ahead and introduces Common carp to the northern Areas. We already have an infestation here. And from the change in feeding habits at Tarbella they also feed on fish fry :evil:

Ali, What do u think about Chitrtal. The Temp is a bit more moderate there :?: Wont Masheer and Sol stand a better chance there :?:


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2007 2:45 pm 
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shaphan wrote:
I really hope that no one goes ahead and introduces Common carp to the northern Areas. We already have an infestation here. And from the change in feeding habits at Tarbella they also feed on fish fry :evil:


Bad news Shaphan, common carps have already been introduced in the northern areas and apparently, they are doing quite well. :twisted: :twisted: :cry:
As for Mahseer, i think lower indus region ie, Chelas and below should be a good area for mahaseer. What do you say Ali????????


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PostPosted: Sat Oct 06, 2007 4:44 pm 
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According to fisbase, both the Goonch and the Golden Mahseer are native to the Indus system.
http://www.fishbase.org/TrophicEco/Fish ... ve_code=34


Last edited by Ken L on Sun Oct 07, 2007 12:15 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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