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INDIANANGLER

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 4:41 am 
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Fishaholic
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Hi....
Been to Kerala trip last week.....,had good freshwater fishing,Caught lots of striped Murrels with live frogs from flooded fields,and
wanted u guys to identify this fish caught By me on earthworm ,the Biggest one will grow only to the size of in the PIC,is either grey with yellow belly,and has scales resembling armoured catfish,when put on ground will crawl like walking catfish or murrel,will often can be found in flooded paddy fields or canals,(Kerala's Version Of Tilipia),but tastier than that, :D ,been catching these from various places in kerala from my childhood,never bothered to chk the english name untill now.

Image

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PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 8:04 am 
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Hi viper,

it is the local variety of the tilapia. In Assam, we call it the Kawoi. It is very tasty but the bone structure is big and has less flesh. tastes best when fried. we also grind curry patta and make a curry with this fish. It is not possible to stock such kind of fish in ponds as it comes out of it during the rainy seasons.

Cheers,
Apoo


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 11:06 am 
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Hi, Seems like the Koee mach from Bengal. check Anabas testudineus . http://aquaworld.netfirms.com/Labyrinth ... dineus.htm


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 11:52 am 
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Yes it is the Koee from Bengal. We in Assam call it the Kawoi


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 1:51 pm 
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Hey Viper

Nice catch, where in Kerala did you catch those. I am going there in December. Could you give me a few locations or possible locales in an around Cochin

cheers


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 4:12 pm 
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Location: Chennai
Is this fish called 'Karup'..A friend of mine brought a similar looking fish from kerala long back...they resembled murrels more that tilapias...i remember these fish having spines near the gills making them difficult to hold by hand


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 4:48 pm 
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Location: 31°25'38.13"N, 76°26'17.69"E
hi Viper...

the fish you cought is the climbing perch (Anabas testudineus).

They are found throughout asia, and are popular aquarium fish... they also have a distant cousin which is again popular in the aquarium known as the Orange Chromide.... again found all across the country side!!!


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PostPosted: Mon Nov 12, 2007 5:27 pm 
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Hi Guys,

Gypsy is right it is the climbing perch . Also called the "tree climbing perch". The reason so called is since all these pond dwelling fish, like these perch , the murrels , the cat fish ect start migrating from the near dry ponds as the monsoon begins. They start crawling up the trickling stream or water that enters the pond seeking fresh water bodies to lay their eggs / spawn. When it comes to this perch, in their over enthusiasm it is quite common to see these fish climbing up coconut trees swimming up the stream of water that runs down the tree trunk from the foliage above during torrential rains.

Jeen


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2007 12:09 am 
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Hey Guys
Really apperciate the Quick response & Info..

& Phish ,this time i had fished only in the flooded paddy fields in alleppey just behind My house :D ,
Not much info abt cochin, But try ur luck in the its backwaters & also near Vypeen & nearby islands,my friends have had some good catch,had used sardine head as Bait.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2007 1:22 am 
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rulerofsun wrote:
Hi, Seems like the Koee mach from Bengal. check Anabas testudineus . http://aquaworld.netfirms.com/Labyrinth ... dineus.htm


yeah!!!!! Its Koee alright, yellow bottom is female and the other is male...
as far as i know. Its taister then telapia for sure,,,,,,


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2007 12:20 pm 
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Hi Guys

Was searching for some interesting Pics on the internet,came across these snaps

Is it Thai Mahseer? & which is the light colored fish in the 2nd Pic,seems that these people are Meatcollectors,

Image


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2007 2:30 pm 
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The dark fish are "Red Mahseer" AKA Thai or Malaysian Mahseer ("Kelah" in Malay) and the lighter fish with the dark vertical stripe are "Jungle Perch" although they're obviously not a perch and are closely related to the Mahseers. These fish are known as "Sebarau" in Malay.

Kelah: http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=aRw05H78XhE&NR=1

Sebarau: http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=zAdeaVczbBw


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2007 5:42 pm 
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Location: 31°25'38.13"N, 76°26'17.69"E
viper wrote:
seems that these people are Meatcollectors,


seems like the so called 'meat collectors do it more for economic reasons than for collecting fish for pickle!!!


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2007 6:39 pm 
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Yeh. Kelah are critically endangered with bigger fish only existing in a few national park locations that are heavily protected.
These locations are now being experimentally opened up to anglers (often from Singapore) who pay big bucks to stay in a lodge and fish.

Sound familiar ?


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 09, 2007 10:39 pm 
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Location: 31°25'38.13"N, 76°26'17.69"E
Ken L wrote:

These locations are now being experimentally opened up to anglers (often from Singapore) who pay big bucks to stay in a lodge and fish.

Sound familiar ?


Its the colour of money- and its all the same no matter where we go!!! Sad but true!


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 8:24 am 
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HI guys,

Just cant resist putting in my ten rupees worth...!

Yes, the red fish are Thai or Malaysian mahseer (depending on which nationality you are!). There are several varieties (or subspecies). It's still not totally conclusive, but there are two accepted species: Tor tambroides (thick lipped) and Tor tambra. Color can vary from deep red to golden to brown to blue.

It's my favourite sportfish! This member of the mahseer family is very challenging: it's found in remote rivers, is very finicky to tempt with a bait, and very few anglers manage to land one on lure (usually a red-coloured spoon or spinner: probably looks like a jungle fruit). I have been fishing for them for 12 years now, and I've not landed one on lure yet!

I believe the Malay name "kelah" actually actually came from India! My readings show that it is the same as the red mahseer of Northern India, where the terms 'kurriah' and 'kukhiah' are used. BTW, we have also the brown mahseer in Malaysia, called 'kejor', and that's the same as the "kajra" of North India and Pakistan.

The kelah grows to about 25 kg in Peninsula Malaysia, and 27 kg in Borneo (where they are called 'empurau'). That's nowhere near the size of mahseer giants of the Cauvery, but the challenge is still as tough since the rivers here are smaller and there's tons of timber and rocks. To catch one of 5kg or more is an achievement.

Typical tackle is spinning gear with 15 -20-lb mainline. Abrasion-resistant lines like Maxima, Ironsilk, Synergy 10X are needed. No braids; you simply get much less bites! My fav hooks are Gamakatsu Octpus 4X in sizes 1 to 3X. These hooks are super strong; I've landed tough Mekong catfish (Pla buk) and Cauvery mahseer with them, no problems. Interestingly, we use near-invisible leaders of 30 - 40-lb, eg. Daiwa Crystal Clear and the fluorocarbons. But the latter need to be thicker; they tend to flake off under abrasion.

The other fish is Sebarau, yes, and it is actually a cyprinid (carp family). The Brits in the 19th century were calling them perch, probably cos their habits are not unlike the perch in the UK. Naughty me coined the name 'jungle perch' in my articles in the local fishing magazine, and the name stuck! Another popular name is Hampala Barb.

The IGFA record for sebarau is 6.5 kg. Personally, I have seen a fish of about 12 kg; it gave me the shivers. These fish can straighten trebles, wreck your lure or break the line, even though they have no teeth. They pounce on bait or lure the way cobia do, streaking in from nowhere and striking at full speed. If you can handle the first 30 seconds of the fight, you've got him.

We use spoons and plugs to catch them. Invariably, the trebles need to be changed to Owner or VMC 4X. I have started to use single lure hooks to good effect, since they don't change the lure action too much.

Hope you find this interesting reading.

><<:>


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 9:03 am 
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Informative discussion. Thanks


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 9:42 am 
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Indeed Informative ..thanks


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 12:19 pm 
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Interesting stuff JB. Thanks


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 1:18 pm 
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Great read matey.

'Jungle perch' ??? I remember reading about them in Papua New Guinea and northen Aussieland. Are they the same fish?

Got to get me one of those!


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PostPosted: Thu Dec 13, 2007 1:45 pm 
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Thanks JB. What I know about these beasties comes from talking with a bunch of Singaporean anglers, so it was interesting to see you put a little flesh on the bones of my knowledge.
I've never had the oppertunity to chase either species. I was invited out to fish for sebarau on my last visit, only to realise that I had to fly on the same day as the planned trip.
I might very well tap you for a little information at some point because I'm an occasional visitor to Malaysia and it's be nice to crack a new species.


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PostPosted: Fri Dec 14, 2007 5:34 am 
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MK,

"'Jungle perch' ??? I remember reading about them in Papua New Guinea and northen Aussieland. Are they the same fish?"

Definitely not! Like I said, the sebarau is actually a river carp, but refered to as a perch due to its roving habits, unlike say the snakeheads which prefer to lay in ambush. It's also a piscivore.

I think the Aussie perch is 'true' perch. I believe the distinct feature is the dorsal fin, with a few strong bony rays.

BTW: In that river where I saw the 12-kg fish, we also saw large sebarau chasing and gulping scissorfish (related to the Indian trout) some 12-inches long!

Ken L,

No worries mate. But dont come now: big mama floods all over! One of my favourite rivers came up 60 feet!!!

Usually, the weather eases down around April or so. As in Cauvery, post monsoon conditions are great for the two species.


><<:>

><<:>


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